David Dowdy, MD, PhD, ScM

Faculty

Titles:

B. Frank and Kathleen Polk Assistant Professor, Epidemiology

Email:

ddowdy1@jhmi.edu

SciVal:

SciVal Link

I am a junior investigator in the field of infectious disease epidemiology, and also a practicing general internist.  My interdisciplinary research lies at the nexus of infectious disease modeling, health economics, operational and implementation science, and classical epidemiology.  My primary interests are:

(1) Modeling of TB and TB/HIV: My greatest research passion is evaluating the implementation and scale-up of TB and HIV control interventions, especially diagnostic and case-finding strategies.  I combine methods from traditional epidemiology, cost-effectiveness analysis, and epidemic modeling with the aim of answering questions of relevance to patients and policy-makers.  I serve on the steering committee of the Gates Foundation-funded TB-Modeling and Analysis Consortium (TB-MAC) and direct two NIH-funded projects related to modeling the scale-up of TB diagnostic tests.  I currently work with collaborators on projects based in Malawi, South Africa, Uganda, India, Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, and the United States. 

(2) Translational epidemiology: I have great interest in creating modeling frameworks that allow decision-makers to translate epidemiological data into effective decisions.  I welcome collaboration from researchers, clinicians, or students having expertise in any field, who hope to create models to translate epidemiological data into meaningful policy, practical, or clinical decisions.

(3) Clinical epidemiology and patient-important outcomes: I am interested in evaluating outcomes of relevance to patients, including quality and duration of life.  Specifically, I work with a cohort study of ICU survivors in Baltimore to investigate long-term outcomes, including strength and quality of life, after critical illness.  I feel strongly about creating closer ties between the worlds of clinical practice and epidemiology.

(4) Teaching and mentorship:  These are essential, and often-undervalued, skills in the field of epidemiology.  If our profession is to continue its record of success, I firmly believe that we need to train future leaders how to teach and mentor others, and also to do our best to serve as role models in that regard.

Categories

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June 2017

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Projects

Assessing the social value of novel regimens...

We are collaborating with investigators from the Berman Bioethics Institute to develop novel techniques for economic evaluation...

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MDR TB treatment as prevention: modeling the...

We are using transmission modeling to evaluate the potential impact of expanding DST and access to MDR TB treatment in Vietnam,...

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FlexDx-TB: A flexible, user-friendly model of...

We have developed a web-based model that allows decision-makers to input local epidemiological and economic values and receive...

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Evaluating an automated system for...

We are evaluating the accuracy and cost-effectiveness of TBDx, an automated digital microscopy system, as a screening test to...

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Population-level impact of isoniazid...

We are collaborating with a team that conducted a randomized trial of IPT in Khayelitsha, South Africa, to extend their findings...

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